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and stealth technology and ability to fight at supersonic speeds. it may be the way it has been able to avoid the budget cutters in washington. ha >> "washington journal," continues. host: we are talking about the roles of security cameras in asian oil security. welcome to the program. talk to us about your thoughts and feelings regarding the role of public and private cameras in national security and the impact of these cameras. seen what we have historically is that public cameras are not good at preventing crime. this has come up in the context of london and the united kingdom, which has some of the largest, most saturated cctv areas. the studies have shown that these cameras are not good for prevention purposes. the next question is are they good for solving crimes? what we have seen in london, which is one of the most saturated areas, is that the cameras are not good at solving crimes. a police steady in london shows that for every 1000 camera there was only one crime that was solved. you have a question of effectiveness. what we see is that they are not. we hear. they did not help to so
of technology of reengaging the public to see something and say something. better intelligence or take a better look at what local law enforcement is seeing. this was my worst nightmare. who didn't have a prior criminal record. someone that got radicalized without a footprint and dame out of nowhere. components for the bomb can be bought at a local store. >> heather: is this something we should see from now on and how do we protect ourselves without becoming a police state? >> the 9/11 cut off the head of al-qaeda. the ability to do the same type of attack is really over. this is what they have to go to now. the challenge is how do you know when someone is radicalized? the key is in talking with commissioner kelly and his team, they switch up everything. it's not about static security. you don't have people that do the same type of patrols. you mix it up. >> heather: flexibility? >> also you use different type of technology. facial recognition is not where it ought to be. cameras are after the event but we need that kind of technology pro-active. the other key is not sit back and say we have to
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to kill. >> this started before 11:00 last night when mit massachusetts institute of technology campus police officer was shot and killed after responding to a report of a disturbance on campus. >> he was apparently shot and killed in his vehicle we are hearing from local police. police responded to a car jacking event at a convenience store that led into a massive chase on to the streets of watertown. that's where the two suspects reportedly began throwing explosive devices at police officers. these guys are armed and extremely dangerous. one is dead in the hospital. >> they were able to get in the mix of the cops. bill hemmer quickly scrambled to the camera. he joins us right now in boston. you can watch on the monitor incredible video of our guys in the middle of the police zeroing in on whom we believe to be the bombing suspect. >> yeah, it is remarkable. brian, if you are just joining us the viewers at home are just waking up, there has been a flurry of activity over the past 6 hours. really over the last 12-hours. if you back up to 5:00 the fbi is quiet for two-days before breath
analysts are doing right now backed in their headquarters. they're using very cutting edge technological tools to mine any of the data that they are able to pull from the first suspect who was killed early this morning. so his travel records, phone records, anything that they could look at, social security number to figure out who might be in the ever-expanding circle of people who knew him. these cutting edge tools would also look on the internet. did these individuals and this is a new thing that happened post-9/11 is that when you are confronted with a potential terrorism threat and knew the individual the first thing you did was go to social media, check on facebook, check on, you know, twitter. >> speak of twitter, the boston police department just tweeted an hour ago, an alert to the media not to disclose the tactical information to compromise officer safety with the homes that are being searched. there are a lot of crews up in boston and a lot of people covering this and a lot of risks in there. >> with the fact that the individuals had ieds with them overnight and were throwing t
time, you could argue that it means a decrease in personnel. because you're using technology, using cameras to replace, you know, eyeballs. but i don't think we've come to that determination. we're down -- the police department is down 6,000 police officers than where we were 11 years ago. so we've already sort of paid the price. and we're using to a certain extent technology to plug the gaps. we're increasing the number of cameras that we have. one of the things that we're doing, we had it in motion prior to the boston marathon. but we want to increase the number of mobile cameras that we have so we can put them up at events and then move them to other events. along our marathon route, we have 220 cameras. but most of them are on bridges. we want to increase at least the public sector cameras that we have along that route. >> all right. new york city police commissioner, ray kelly, thank you very much. it's always good to see you. >> thank you for the great job you keep doing for the city. >> thank you. >>> a new book on afghanistan that's not so good. president hamid karzai had to
of their high tech technology devices that can see inside and register that he was there. brian ross, anything else that stood out to you? >> reporter: they talked about an exchange of gun fire, diane. they did shoot back at some point. and may have hit him when they did, i was told. so, that wasn't quite that they held off entirely. but it was exactly as martha and pierre described to us as we came forward with a special looking radar that sees thermal images and certainly the u.s. attorney said that they have made a public security exception and not give him his miranda warning. they will question him about what larger terror cell he might or might not be part of. >> again, it was dave hennebury who went back to look at his beloved boat and saw, instead, the man suspected of being a terrorist, a bomber. and we're told he's in his 60s, he's a retired telecommunications worker. and it was his phone call that really directed the police. we are getting so many reports out of boston on facebook from people saying, that's why they call them boston's bravest, boston proud, boston grateful and also
institute of technology, a campus police officer was shot to death in his police cruiser, his name is sean collier, 26 years old. he joined the force only in 2012. he was new at m.i.t. in terms of being a police officer there. he was found dead in his police car. to get back to the narrative of last night, a car was carjacked, a man thrown out of the c called police and said that he believed that the marathon bombers had just taken his car. police found the car, began a chase, bombs were thrown from the car at the police officers. there was a running gun battle. the car stopped. there was a gun battle in which 200 rounds of ammunition were fired and bombs again were thrown at the police officers. in that fire fight 26-year-old tamerlan tsarnaev was killed. a police officer was gravely wounded. from last night, that is one officer dead, another wounded. weer to told that the wounded officer is in critical but stable condition in the hospital after surgery tonight. tamerlan tsarnaev was killed. his brother, the 19-year-old, fled on foot and has been since then the target of a massive manhunt
feel, the way th you think. some of the new technologies i like is this virtual realities where we take you to the lab and you're actually watching the video of this scene and slowly monitoring your heart rate, your blood pressure, and over time, that's the word that you use, it's to desensitize you to that trauma. it's almost like being afraid of height and you go back again to the same thing and you get better and better. that's a big thing, exposure therapy, that's a big part of it. >> jamie: are you talking about like two weeks of treatment, a month of treatment, or some people are genetically prone to anxiety where maybe they need to be, you know, protectively on some treatment? >> absolutely. it may be months and months, or it may actually lead into underlying psychiatric problems that preexisted this that may be brought out. there's a group of people that not only -- cognitive behavioral therapy is number one. david is right. diversionary activities are important, too, getting back to laughter and daily life is hugely important. jamie, for some of us, it's necessary to give medic
and the technology used by law enforcement to take tsarnaev into custody. night vision cameras spotted him hiding in a boat. and flash-bang grenades were used to stun and disorient him. all this while the city of boston prepares to say good-bye to one of the victims. krystle campbell. she's one of three people who died in last monday's marathon attack. joining us right now is boston's police commissioner. he has been right in the middle of this all. ed davis, thank you so much for joining us. i really appreciate it. >> good morning. >> commissioner, what can you tell me about dzhokhar tsarnaev's condition right now? >> he's in serious but stable condition at the beth israel hospital. we have officers who are guarding him. he -- he's progressing at this point. >> you say he is progressing. is he communicating with investigators right now? >> those -- there have been widely published reports that he is. i wouldn't dispute that but i don't have any specific information on that myself. >> you say you wouldn't dispute that. of course we understand he's been sedated, intubated. has he been able to comm
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10

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